Gov. Newsom Signs Law Allowing Californians Living in U.S. Illegally to Serve on Government Boards

California attorney general Xavier Becerra looks on as California Gov. Gavin Newson speaks during a news conference at the California justice department on Sept. 18, 2019, in Sacramento. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

California attorney general Xavier Becerra looks on as California Gov. Gavin Newson speaks during a news conference at the California justice department on Sept. 18, 2019, in Sacramento. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

California lawmakers continued the state’s expansion of rights and protections this year for immigrants who enter the country illegally, with laws signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom allowing them to serve on government boards and commissions and banning arrests for immigration violations in courthouses across the state.

The efforts by Newsom and Democrats in the California Legislature to provide refuge to immigrants stand in sharp contrast to the policies of President Trump, who continues to push for a new wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and also crack down on asylum seekers.

“Our state doesn’t succeed in spite of our diversity — our state succeeds because of it,” Newsom said in a written statement on Saturday after signing some of the bills into law. “While Trump attacks and disparages immigrants, California is working to ensure that every resident — regardless of immigration status — is given respect and the opportunity to contribute.”

The legislation signed by Newsom also expands California’s college student loan program for so-called Dreamers, young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children, to include students seeking graduate degrees at the University of California and California State University schools. Undergraduate Dreamers already are eligible for those loans and in-state tuition. The new laws take effect Jan. 1.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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