Most Evacuations Lifted in Getty Fire; Blaze 39% Contained at 745 Acres

Data pix.

Most mandatory evacuation orders have been lifted in the Getty Fire, Los Angeles Fire Department officials announced Wednesday afternoon. The blaze has scorched 745 acres and was 39% contained as of Wednesday night.

The evacuations that remain in place are:

  • On the west border: Kenter Aveune
  • South border: Sunset Boulevard
  • North border: Area just south of Mountaingate Drive
  • East border: Area adjacent to 405 Freeway and Sepulveda Boulevard
Firefighters gather their hoses near destroyed homes along North Tigertail Road during the Getty Fire on Oct. 29, 2019. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)

Firefighters gather their hoses near destroyed homes along North Tigertail Road during the Getty Fire on Oct. 29, 2019. (Credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)

Earlier Wednesday, residents evacuated during the Getty Fire were being allowed to visit their homes to collect medicine or other items left behind during the blaze.

Residents who wanted to visit their homes were asked to show valid ID with proof of where they live.

Firefighters were prepared to make quick work of any Getty Fire flare-ups as gusty winds, possibly up to 80 mph, pick up in the area.

Crews spent the day Tuesday dousing as many hot spots as possible in an attempt to keep embers from igniting another large fire.

The Getty Fire began when a tree branch fell on some power lines during a strong wind event about 1:30 a.m. Monday morning in the Sepulveda Pass.

Video recorded by a driver on the 405 Freeway captured what is believed to be the start of the fire.

The flames spread quickly, destroying 12 homes and scorching Brentwood and surrounding areas. Another five homes were damaged.

LAFD shared this image of a tree branch that fell on power lines and apparently sparked the Getty Fire on Oct. 28, 2019.

LAFD shared this image of a tree branch that fell on power lines and apparently sparked the Getty Fire on Oct. 28, 2019.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Los Angeles Department of Water and Power equipment was not at fault and described the incident as an β€œact of God.”

An extreme red flag warning went into effect at 11 p.m. Tuesday and will remain in place until 6 p.m. Thursday.

The combination of powerful offshore winds and dry air is expected to bring "very high fire danger" to the region, according to the National Weather Service.

β€œIt only takes one ember to blow downwind to start another fire,” Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas said during a news conference on Tuesday. "Embers have been known to travel several miles," he said.

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