Tucson to Decide Whether It Will Be Arizona’s Only Sanctuary City

Scott Warren, a volunteer for the humanitarian aid organization No More Deaths, speaks with local residents during a community meeting to discuss federal charges against him for providing food and shelter to undocumented immigrants on May 10, 2019, in Ajo, Ariz. Warren was scheduled to appear in court for felony charges on May 29, in Tucson, accused by the U.S. government on two counts of harboring and one count of conspiracy for providing food, water, and beds to two Central American immigrants in January 2018. If found guilty, Warren could face up to 20 years in prison. (Credit: John Moore/Getty Images)

Scott Warren, a volunteer for the humanitarian aid organization No More Deaths, speaks with local residents during a community meeting to discuss federal charges against him for providing food and shelter to undocumented immigrants on May 10, 2019, in Ajo, Ariz. Warren was scheduled to appear in court for felony charges on May 29, in Tucson, accused by the U.S. government on two counts of harboring and one count of conspiracy for providing food, water, and beds to two Central American immigrants in January 2018. If found guilty, Warren could face up to 20 years in prison. (Credit: John Moore/Getty Images)

Tucson voters are deciding whether to make the liberal enclave Arizona’s only sanctuary city.

The measure known as Proposition 205 is on the ballot Tuesday in Arizona’s second most populous city.

Supporters say a victory would send the message to immigrants that they’re valued and protected.

It comes amid fierce anger on the left at President Donald Trump’s immigration policies. The measure aims to put new restrictions on when police can inquire about immigration status or cooperate with federal law enforcement.

The Democratic City Council strongly opposes the sanctuary initiative. Mayor Jonathan Rothschild says the city already has strong protections for immigrants. He worries it would endanger state and federal funding.

Both sides say the measure is likely to end up in court if it’s approved.

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