I Looked Through Smart Contact Lenses that Put Information Right Into Your Field of View

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A smart contact lens that lets you see like never before!

Contact lenses help people see better, but one startup is taking that idea to the extreme.

Recently, we checked out a contact lens that contains the world’s tiniest display. This means you can see information displayed right onto the world around you.

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The startup behind the technology is Mojo Vision.

"We’re creating the world’s first true smart contact lens," said Steve Sinclair with Mojo Vision.

The lens looks thicker than your typical contact lens but it contains wireless data and power, along with what Mojo says is the world's smallest display.

"Eventually all the screens should go away and you should be able to see information wherever we want to see it," explained Sinclair.

Although I wan't allowed to put the contact in my eye, I was able to look through it.

As soon as I put it up to my eye, I could see a little display with information. Words and data were suddenly displayed directly onto the world around me.

As I moved the contact lens around, I could see the data no matter where I was looking.

Basically, the information you might glance down at your watch or phone screen for is now directly in your line of sight.

"We want people’s eyes to be up, we want their hands to be free, and we want them to interact with the real world, it’s a concept we call invisible computing," explained Sinclair.

In another demo, the lens let me virtually see in the dark by overlaying augmented reality content including edges and text onto items in a darkened room.

"Some of our first customers we believe are people who suffer from low vision conditions, glaucoma or macular degeneration," said Sinclair.

Done right, these tiny lenses could have a big impact in the medical field and even on smartphones. Imagine important text messages, notes to a speech, navigation directions and other vital information magically appearing in your field of view!

"It may seem counterintuitive to put the screen closer to the eye, but it will help us bring our heads up and be focused on the world around us," concluded Sinclair.

The technology is still a few years off and must be approved by the FDA. When I inquired about the thickness of the lenses, Mojo said that probably won’t change, as it's a medical grade lens they say is comfortable to wear.

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