As L.A. Traffic Deaths Remain High, Officials Plead With Drivers to Stop Texting

Drivers make their way on the US 101 freeway on August 30, 2019 in Los Angeles. (Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Drivers make their way on the US 101 freeway on August 30, 2019 in Los Angeles. (Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

In the fourth full year of a program designed to eliminate traffic fatalities on Los Angeles streets, the number of people killed in car crashes stayed stubbornly high, early data show.

Last year, 244 people were killed in traffic collisions on city streets, a decrease of 0.8% compared to 2018, according to preliminary figures from the city. The victims included 134 people who were walking and 19 people biking.

The data may change slightly with additional analysis, officials said. But the early figures suggest another year of lackluster progress for Vision Zero, Mayor Eric Garcetti’s initiative to eliminate traffic deaths on city streets by 2025.

Since Vision Zero was launched in 2015, the number of pedestrians, vehicle occupants, bicyclists and motorcyclists killed annually in traffic crashes has risen 33%. Fatalities surged in 2016 from 183 to 253, and have fallen 3.6% since then.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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