44% of Californians report clinical levels of anxiety, depression during COVID-19 pandemic

California
Feelings of depression and anxiety are up in California and around the nation because of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Feelings of depression and anxiety are up in California and around the nation because of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

It’s official, California: COVID-19 has left us sick with worry and increasingly depressed. And our youngest adults — those ages 18 to 29 — are feeling it the worst.

Weekly surveys conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau from late April through late July offer a grim view of the toll the pandemic has taken on mental health in the Golden State and across the nation. By late July, more than 44% of California adults reported levels of anxiety and gloom typically associated with diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder or major depressive disorder — a stunning figure that rose through the summer months alongside the menacing spread of the coronavirus.

The U.S. at large has followed a similar pattern, with about 41% of adult respondents nationwide reporting symptoms of clinical anxiety or depression during the third week of July. By comparison, just 11% of American adults reported those symptoms in a similar survey conducted in early 2019.

The July responses showed a marked geographic variance. Residents of Western and Southern states, where the virus remains most virulent, registered greater mental distress, on average.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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