9th Circuit revives suit challenging California law mandating women serve on public company boards

California
Gov. Jerry Brown speaks during an event at the National Press Club April 17, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Gov. Jerry Brown speaks during an event at the National Press Club April 17, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

A federal appeals court on Monday revived a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a California law that requires women be placed on the boards of publicly owned companies.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously decided that a shareholder had the legal right to sue California to invalidate the 2018 law, which requires all publicly held corporations with principal executive offices in California to have women on their boards of directors.

At the time he signed the bill into law, then Gov. Jerry Brown expressed concerns that it might not survive a legal challenge.

The law already has raised the number of women on corporate boards in California. Companies have filled vacant seats with women or expanded their boards. Other states have followed California’s lead, introducing similar measures.

Read the full story at LATimes.com

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