CA moves to stop excessive punishment of Black and disabled students at Barstow, Oroville school districts

California
In Los Angeles in 2013, high school students celebrate the LAUSD decision to ban student suspensions for “willful defiance.” California banned the practice for all K-8 students in 2019.(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

In Los Angeles in 2013, high school students celebrate the LAUSD decision to ban student suspensions for “willful defiance.” California banned the practice for all K-8 students in 2019.(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

Three school districts in Barstow and Oroville discriminated against Black students and students with disabilities by excessively disciplining them, prompting the state to impose five-year corrective plans, California Atty. General Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.

The California Department of Justice found that Barstow Unified School District, Oroville City Elementary School District and Oroville Union High School District had a “systemic over-reliance on punitive, exclusionary discipline against Black students and students with disabilities,” according to a news release from Becerra’s office. It also found that the districts failed to respond adequately to complaints of harassment and discrimination, including in some cases the use of racial slurs.

“Our society is built on how we educate our children,” Becerra said in the release.“When our schools use punishment discriminately, it has lasting consequences. And when our schools fail to adequately address bullying or racial harassment, we all suffer.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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