California’s highest-in-the-nation gas taxes are rising and promised repairs are lagging

California
Cars make their way toward downtown L.A. on the 110 freeway during the morning commute on April 22, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Cars make their way toward downtown L.A. on the 110 freeway during the morning commute on April 22, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Four years after the Legislature boosted the gas tax in order to fix California’s crumbling roads and bridges, the state has spent billions and made some progress in repairs, but officials now say the funding is sufficient only to complete less than half of the work needed.

The gas tax has been a political hot potato since it was passed in 2017, resulting in the recall of a Democratic state senator who voted for the legislation and an unsuccessful attempt by Republicans in 2018 to ask voters to repeal the higher charges.

Now, with the gas tax set to increase again July 1, the campaign to fix roads and bridges is again stirring contention, drawing criticism from some lawmakers who say repairs have been too slow and the effort has lagged behind other states in maintaining and improving transportation systems.

The program to fix roads has been hampered by California’s high cost of repairs compared with other states and by the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in less driving and therefore hundreds of millions fewer gas-tax dollars than expected. In addition, with people driving more electric and fuel- efficient cars, state officials are studying ways to make up for the loss of gas tax revenue, possibly with fees tied to miles driven.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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