COVID-19 cases stop SoCal from reopening schools as state lowers threshold for resuming in-person classes

California
First grade instructor Laura Sanchez speaks to her returning students at St. Joseph Catholic School in La Puente, California on November 16, 2020, where pre-kindergarten to Second Grade students in need of special services returned to the classroom today for in-person instruction. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images)

First grade instructor Laura Sanchez speaks to her returning students at St. Joseph Catholic School in La Puente, California on November 16, 2020, where pre-kindergarten to Second Grade students in need of special services returned to the classroom today for in-person instruction. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images)

Governor Gavin Newsom has made changes to his plan to reopen schools, including a small decrease in the case rate that would allow elementary students to campus for in-person classes.

Under the new guidance, K-6 schools in counties with a seven-day average of 25 or fewer cases per 100,000 residents would be eligible to begin reopening, down from the 28 cases per 100,000 that the governor had announced in December.

But even that reduced number is significantly lower than the current rates in many California counties, offering diminished hope that schools — particularly in Southern California — can reopen soon. In L.A. County, for example, the adjusted COVID-19 case rate is 77 per 100,000 residents; Orange County, 79; Riverside County, 107; San Bernardino County 103 and San Diego County, 70.

In December, Newsom announced a $2-billion package of incentives to encourage a return to in-person classes. It prioritized returning students in kindergarten through second grade as well as those with special needs starting in mid-February, with the remainder of elementary school students returning early as mid- March. It is unclear when older students would return to campuses.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

Most Popular

Latest News

More News