Klamath farmers raise fish to quell water war as drought slams California and Oregon

California
The Gone Fishing complex is home to thousands of endangered sucker fish that will eventually be released back to the Upper Klamath Lake. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

The Gone Fishing complex is home to thousands of endangered sucker fish that will eventually be released back to the Upper Klamath Lake. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

It’s a strange place to find fish, deep in the high desert, where drought-baked earth butts against scrubby mountains.

But water spews from the hot springs on Ron Barnes’ land near the California-Oregon border, pure and perfect for rearing c’waam and koptu, two kinds of endangered suckerfish sacred to Native American tribes.

Barnes, who holds an advanced degree in aquaculture from UC Davis, has dug dozens of ponds on his property and filled them with thousands of young suckerfish. He hopes raising and releasing them into the wild will end the region’s epic water wars — or at least get federal regulators out of the mix before his neighbors descend into violence.

“We have to take a pragmatic view of this thing,” said Barnes, standing near his black-bottomed lagoons under an intense morning sun. “The single most effective way to get the government off our backs is to restore the fish population.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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