SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KTXL) — A case of monkeypox, related to travel in Europe, is being investigated by the Sacramento County Division of Public Health and is waiting for confirmation from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), according to Public Health.

Sacramento County Public Health Officer Dr. Olivia Kasirye held a press conference Tuesday morning to provide specific details on the case.

According to Kasirye, monkeypox is similar to smallpox but less severe.

There are vaccines available for the virus, one that is specific to smallpox and a newer one for monkeypox, but they must be ordered through the CDC, according to Kasirye.

Kasirye said that the CDC will only consider distributing a vaccine in an outbreak scenario, but regular cleaning detergents are effective at killing the virus.

The process for contact tracing is still being determined as the virus is less transmissible compared to COVID-19 and there are no signs of special cases such as age or health condition, according to Kasirye.

According to Public Health, the patient is isolated at home and has not been in contact with any other people and any risk to the general public is very minimal.

Monkeypox transmission can occur when a person comes in contact with an animal, person or material contaminated with the virus, according to public health.

The virus enters through broken skin, respiratory tract or the mucous membranes. The respiratory droplets can not travel more than a few feet, so long-term face-to-face contact is required, according to Public Health.

According to Public Health, monkeypox does not naturally occur in the United States and US cases are related to international travel or importing animals from areas where the disease may exist.

Symptoms may not appear for seven to 14 days after infection and can last two to four weeks, according to Public Health.

Monkeypox symptoms:

  • fever
  • headache
  • muscle aches
  • backache
  • swollen lymph nodes
  • chills
  • exhaustion

A rash can appear on the face and spread to other parts of the body one to three days after the appearance of a fever, according to Public Health.

For more information regarding Monkeypox visit the official CDC monkeypox page or the CDPH page on the disease.