San Marino high school cancels active-shooter drill that included sound of gunfire

California
Students take cover under their desks during a school drill on Oct. 18, 2018, in San Francisco, California. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Students take cover under their desks during a school drill on Oct. 18, 2018, in San Francisco, California. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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San Marino High School was ready for its active-shooter drill Friday morning. City police officers planned to fire blank cartridges over 11 minutes to familiarize students with the sound of gunfire. Staff would teach students about a protection strategy called “run, hide, fight” in the event of a shooting emergency.

But the American Civil Liberties Union intervened and asked Principal Issaic Gates to stop the drill, concerned that it could be too traumatic for teenagers. On Thursday, the San Marino school district canceled it. American Civil Liberties UnionBut the American Civil Liberties Union intervened and asked Principal Issaic Gates to stop the drill, concerned that it could be too traumatic for teenagers. On Thursday, the San Marino school district canceled it.

“We of course were deeply concerned with any active-shooter drill, but certainly one where they were going to be shooting guns,” said Sylvia Torres-Guillén, director of education equity for the ACLU of California. “Our objective is to ensure that youth are in schools that are sanctuaries of learning and not places where they’re inflicted with trauma.”

Schools across California and the nation are increasingly practicing active-shooter drills in the face of gun violence on campus. At least 16 states, including California, now require or encourage schools to carry out active-shooter drills, according to one analysis, and 95% of schools nationwide conducted a drill in the 2014-15 school year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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