Sacramento has multiple landmarks that are considered iconic structures in the city, including the Tower Bridge, Ziggurat building, State Capitol and Old Sacramento. 

But a very distinct and instantly recognizable structure in the city is hidden in a neighborhood of warehouses in the Natomas area. 

At the southwest corner of Gateway Park and Arena boulevards is a three-story red Coca-Cola cup, complete with a straw. 

The gigantic Coca-Cola cup was built in 1996 and is illuminated at night, according to Weird California.

The large cup is attached to a Coca-Cola Bottling Co. bottling plant that distributes products across Northern California. The oversized cup has been part of the building for decades but is not in a well-known place in the city.

You probably encountered the cup while driving through the streets on your way to a concert or a Sacramento Kings game at Sleep Train Arena, located about two miles away. 

In 2017, the red Coca-Cola cup and the building at 4101 Gateway Park Boulevard was purchased by Reyes Holdings, an Illinois-based beverage distribution company, the Sacramento Business Journal reported. 

The distribution company purchased the oversized cup as part of a $14.77 million property sale. 

Sacramento’s large Coca-Cola structure isn’t the only similar structure on the West Coast. It’s one of several on the west coast that pays homage to the internationally known soft drink company.

One of the most recognizable large structures appears in San Francisco at Oracle Park, home of the MLB’s Giants. A Coke bottle, located behind the left field bleachers, has served as a fan attraction since it opened in 2000. 

The bottle, which is 80 feet long, has playground slides and is accompanied by a giant baseball glove, another iconic structure within the park. 

Other large Coca-Cola structures include a large Coke bottle outside of the Coca-Cola Store on the Las Vegas strip at 3785 South Las Vegas Boulevard. 

A Coke bottle statue also stands adjacent to the Coca-Cola bottling plant in Los Angeles at 1334 South Central Avenue. The plant, which was designed by Robert A. Derrah, was designated as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1975.