Younger black and Latino Californians are dying of COVID-19 at higher rates, data show

California
Workers wearing personal protective equipment perform drive-up COVID-19 testing at Mend Urgent Care testing site for the novel coronavirus at the Westfield Culver City on April 24, 2020, in Culver City. A nasopharyngeal swab test kit is used at this COVID-19 testing center to determine the viral load and virus count of a patient. (Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

Workers wearing personal protective equipment perform drive-up COVID-19 testing at Mend Urgent Care testing site for the novel coronavirus at the Westfield Culver City on April 24, 2020, in Culver City. A nasopharyngeal swab test kit is used at this COVID-19 testing center to determine the viral load and virus count of a patient. (Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

Black and Latino Californians ages 18 to 64 are dying more frequently of COVID-19 than their white and Asian counterparts relative to their share of the population, a Times analysis of state health department data shows.

Newly released figures on the grim toll of the novel coronavirus show once again profound disparities in people’s odds of survival that fall along racial and ethnic lines. In this case, the data also belie the conventional wisdom that old age is the primary risk factor for death.

When accounting for each group’s share of the population, black and Latino patients under the age of 65 had higher rates of fatality than even older blacks and Latinos — although people over 65 still make up the overwhelming majority of COVID-19 deaths. The trend is particularly noticeable among those age 18 to 49, The Times analysis found.

Preliminary racial data released by health officials in California and L.A. County earlier this month suggested Latinos were not facing any higher rate of infection or death from the virus. But experts warned that those findings were likely skewed by the fact that Latinos, California’s largest ethnic group, are typically younger than other demographics. Experts predicted that higher rates would emerge once more complete data came out.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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