L.A. County’s coronavirus death rate falls below that of Bay Area in another sign of dramatic recovery

Coronavirus
People walk through the Santa Monica pier ahead of Memorial Day in Santa Monica, California on May 29, 2021. (Photo by Apu Gomes / AFP)

People walk through the Santa Monica pier ahead of Memorial Day in Santa Monica, California on May 29, 2021. (Photo by Apu Gomes / AFP)

For much of the pandemic, the San Francisco Bay Area managed to limit the spread of the coronavirus far more dramatically than Los Angeles County, which ended up as one of the nation’s hardest-hit regions.

But in a sign of its dramatic recovery, L.A. County reported about two COVID-19 deaths a day over the past week, down from a peak of 241 in January. By comparison, the Bay Area — comprising Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, Santa Clara, San Francisco, San Mateo, Solano and Sonoma counties — is reporting four deaths a day, down from a peak of 63. L.A. County has a population of 10 million; the Bay Area has 7.7 million.

This is just one more piece of evidence about how the course of COVID-19 has changed in California, and why officials are confident that the state faces little risk of the surges that repeatedly shut down large swaths of the economy over the past 15 months.

The Bay Area was an entry point for the coronavirus in California. The nation’s first confirmed COVID-19 death was of a San Jose resident, who died Feb. 6, 2020.

Read the full story at LATimes.com

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