California Proposition 24: Expanding data privacy laws

Election guide

Voting yes on Prop 24 means building on the California Consumer Privacy Act that went into effect last January, prompting companies to send out emails and pop-up messages that let people opt out of having their information sold. 

Prop 24 would create a new state agency to oversee and enforce privacy laws, as well as let consumers tell businesses to limit use of their data, such as their location, race and health information. 

Voting no on Prop 24 means keeping in place existing privacy laws, which would continue to be overseen by the state Department of Justice.

Supporters: San Francisco real estate magnate Alastair Mactaggart, who said that he became a consumer advocate after learning about how much tech companies know about their users when he had lunch with a Google employee, pushed for the state’s landmark consumer privacy law. 

Now, he’s arguing that “there are additional rights that Californians deserve” and is bankrolling Prop 24. 

Former Democratic presidential candidate and entrepreneur Andrew Yang also supports the measure, along with the Consumer Watchdog

Critics: Opponents include the Consumer Federation of California and the ACLU, which says that Prop 24 “requires people to jump through more hoops and adds anti-privacy loopholes for big business.” 

The opposition argument in the official voter guide says that the initiative “was written behind closed doors with input from social media corporations.”

In this Dec. 20, 2019, photo, San Francisco real estate developer Alastair Mactaggart poses in Oakland. With help, Mactaggart produced a ballot initiative that would let California voters implement new privacy rules. Although initially a long shot, the proposal quickly gained steam amid news of huge data breaches and privacy leaks. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
In this Dec. 20, 2019, photo, San Francisco real estate developer Alastair Mactaggart poses in Oakland. With help, Mactaggart produced a ballot initiative that would let California voters implement new privacy rules. Although initially a long shot, the proposal quickly gained steam amid news of huge data breaches and privacy leaks. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

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