Bobcat Fire aftermath threatens federally protected species in San Gabriel Mountains

Local news
A deer searches for food after the Bobcat fire devastated its habitat in the San Gabriel Mountains. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

A deer searches for food after the Bobcat fire devastated its habitat in the San Gabriel Mountains.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

Up until a few weeks ago, the West Fork of the San Gabriel River was one of the most abundant wildlife habitats in Los Angeles County, a secluded and rugged area defined by its steep peaks, lush canyons and mixture of rare and endangered species.

Recently however, a team of federal biologists and forest rangers was aghast when it visited the stream following the Bobcat fire, which has burned more than 115,000 acres in the heart of the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument.

Terrain that once resembled a High Sierra granite gorge now looked like ground zero after a nuclear explosion, and the usually clean mountain air was sharp with the stench of smoke.

Particularly unsettling were the bare and ashen slopes that were now primed to dissolve under pounding winter storms. A heavy mudslide, experts said, could reverse decades of conservation efforts by inundating the last outposts for such federally protected species as the Santa Ana sucker fish and Southern California mountain yellow-legged frog.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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