As coronavirus ravaged California nursing homes, inspectors were not being tested

Local news
California health officials have required COVID-19 testing of residents and employees at nursing homes, such as this one in Reseda in 2020, but have not provided comprehensive testing to their own inspectors who regularly visit the facilities. (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times)

California health officials have required COVID-19 testing of residents and employees at nursing homes, such as this one in Reseda in 2020, but have not provided comprehensive testing to their own inspectors who regularly visit the facilities. (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times)

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Since early in the COVID-19 pandemic, California health officials have required nursing homes to bar entry to outsiders who might bring the coronavirus in with them and trigger a deadly outbreak among the elderly, vulnerable residents.

As a result, aging parents haven’t seen their families in months. Many have died without a final embrace from the people they loved.

But despite requiring routine testing of residents and employees, there’s one group California health officials have knowingly sent from nursing home to nursing home without first testing them for the lethal virus: state inspectors.

Interviews with eight registered nurses working as inspectors for the California Department of Public Health — all of whom spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation — revealed that the department has not provided coronavirus testing for the very people it is sending to make sure facilities comply with rules on infection control.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

Copyright 2022 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Most Popular

 

Latest News

More News