Californians who already voted for Buttigieg or Steyer grapple with desire for a do-over

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US Presidential Candidate and former South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks to veterans and members of the public at a town hall event at the American Legion Post 98 in Merrimack, New Hampshire on February 6, 2020. (Credit: JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

US Presidential Candidate and former South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks to veterans and members of the public at a town hall event at the American Legion Post 98 in Merrimack, New Hampshire on February 6, 2020. (Credit: JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

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There may be plenty of second chances in life, but there are very few when it comes to voting — a bitter pill to swallow for those Californians who voted for any of the presidential candidates that dropped out before Tuesday’s statewide election.

The sudden exit from the race Sunday by Pete Buttigieg, former mayor of South Bend, Ind., sparked some brief interest on social media about the rules governing a possible revote. No doubt similar questions were raised by those who cast early absentee ballots for Tom Steyer, the billionaire climate change activist who left the race Saturday.

The answer, in a word: no. There’s no provision in California election law for a second chance once a ballot has been mailed or cast in person at a polling place or regional vote center.

“Once you vote, you vote,” said Kim Alexander, president of the nonpartisan California Voter Foundation. “There’s no do-over.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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