California’s Bullet Train Headed Toward Multibillion-Dollar Overrun, Confidential Federal Report Warns

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California’s bullet train could cost taxpayers 50% more than estimated — as much as $3.6 billion more. And that’s just for the first 118 miles through the Central Valley, which was supposed to be the easiest part of the route between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

A drawing of the proposed bullet train. When completed, the trip from L.A. to San Francisco is estimated to take 2.5 hours. (Credit: California High-Speed Rail Authority/EPA)
A drawing of the proposed bullet train. When completed, the trip from L.A. to San Francisco is estimated to take 2.5 hours. (Credit: California High-Speed Rail Authority/EPA)

A confidential Federal Railroad Administration analysis, obtained by The Times, projects that building bridges, viaducts, trenches and track from Merced to Shafter could cost $9.5 billion to $10 billion, compared with the original budget of $6.4 billion.

The federal document outlines far-reaching management problems: significant delays in environmental planning, lags in processing invoices for federal grants and continuing failures to acquire needed property.

The California High-Speed Rail Authority had originally anticipated completing the Central Valley track by this year, but the federal risk assessment estimates that that won’t happen until 2024, placing the project seven years behind schedule.

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com. 

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