California’s Presidential Primary Hinges on Big Voting Changes in L.A. County

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A 2020 image shows how Los Angeles County’s new voting machines require voters to use a touch-screen to make choices that are then printed on a paper ballot. (Credit: Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

A 2020 image shows how Los Angeles County’s new voting machines require voters to use a touch-screen to make choices that are then printed on a paper ballot. (Credit: Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)

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When Los Angeles County set out to build a new voting system from scratch more than a decade ago, election officials knew the challenges in serving an electorate larger than those found in any of 39 states.

But what they didn’t know was that their efforts were on a collision course with a series of statewide election changes and the most consequential presidential primary in modern California history. Should Angelenos not understand what to do or where to go, the effects could be felt both statewide and — in terms of the Democratic presidential race — across the country.

“There’s a lot riding on this,” said Rick Hasen, an election law professor at UC Irvine. “Any time you’re making so many changes at once, people can lose confidence in the system.”

The list of changes is long: L.A. ballots have been fully redesigned; thousands of neighborhood polling places are gone, replaced by fewer regional voting centers; and once there, millions of Angelenos will use new touch-screen devices approved by state officials just weeks ago.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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