From a giant sinkhole in Chatsworth, to mudflows and flooding in Montecito, crews are working diligently across Southern California to clean up the mess left behind by a powerful storm.

The work comes days before yet another storm is set to hit the area over the weekend.

Inspectors and Los Angeles public works officials are working to repair a massive sinkhole in Chatsworth that continues to grow.

Cars remain in a large sinkhole along Iverson Road in Chatsworth on Jan. 10, 2023. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
Cars remain in a large sinkhole along Iverson Road in Chatsworth on Jan. 10, 2023. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)

The hole near the 118 Freeway that swallowed two cars is now as wide as Iverson Avenue and about 40 feet deep.

A mother and her daughter were rescued and taken to the hospital Monday night after their Nissan, along with a pickup truck, fell inside the sinkhole.

Neighbors who wanted to see the sinkhole for themselves were surprised no one was killed when it opened up.

“I think infrastructure is always a worry in a city this size, especially when we start to get insane amounts of rain,” neighbor Lucas Cantor Santiago said. “We don’t have weather events here, other than the occasional gigantic rainstorm, and the city is just not equipped to deal with it, because why would we be? It hardly ever happens.”

L.A. City Councilmember John Lee said officials need to figure out how to divert water away from the hole so it doesn’t fill up during the next storm and create faster erosion.

In Studio City, crews are working to clean mud left over from a debris flow that trapped vehicles and made a mess of the roadways. Public works officials said some of the areas are covered in nearly five feet of mud. Some vehicles were still stuck Wednesday morning, but no injuries have been reported.

Further north, in Ventura County, Highway 33 was closed in both directions from Lomita Avenue in Ojai to Ozena Fire Station just south of Lockwood Valley Road in the Los Padres National Forest.

Multiple rock and mud slides damaged the road, requiring emergency repairs, but it is unclear how long that will take, according to Caltrans.

Highway 126 in Fillmore was finally reopened Tuesday night after mudflows there caused drivers to be stranded for hours the previous night.

Officials asses the damage of flooding and mudflows in Studio City on Jan. 10, 2023. (KTLA)
Officials asses the damage of flooding and mudflows in Studio City on Jan. 10, 2023. (KTLA)

Highway 23 was also reopened between Fillmore and Moorpark, as was Topanga Canyon Boulevard.

Caltrans officials offered this current list of road closures in L.A. and Ventura counties.

Then, in Montecito, which is no stranger to major storm damage, waterways turned into raging rivers that threatened dozens of homes.

On Wednesday, Montecito Creek was more manageable and a massive cleanup effort was underway. Firefighters and public works officials are assessing the full damage to homes and hillsides.

Heavy rainfall collapsed numerous portions of mountain roads, triggered rockslides and forced evacuations in Montecito and Santa Barbara.

The biggest concerns now are mudslides and debris flows. Saturated hillsides have been crumbling under the weight of the rain as the Central Coast was battered with back-to-back atmospheric rivers.

Despite heavy rainfall and historic totals, flood control systems worked in the area thanks to safety improvements to creeks and catch basins made over the last several years.

The community has also hired debris flow scientists to better predict what might happen during major storms.

Montecito Fire Protection District Chief Jeff Taylor told KTLA that 500,000 cubic yards of materials were captured by the flood control systems in the area.

Officials also indicated that even a few more inches of rain anticipated during the new storm could lead to another disastrous event because of the rocks, downed trees and other debris still in the catch basins.