Coastal Cities Give in to Expanded Housing as SoCal Favors Less Development in I.E.

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This undated photos shows a housing project under construction in downtown Los Angeles. (Credit: Los Angeles Times)

This undated photos shows a housing project under construction in downtown Los Angeles. (Credit: Los Angeles Times)

In a dramatic shift to how Southern California cities plan to grow over the next decade, a regional agency decided Thursday to push for more housing in coastal rather than inland communities.

Under the plan, communities in Los Angeles and Orange counties will have to accommodate more than 1 million new houses — more than triple the amount of both Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Culver City, for example, will have to zone for 3,300 new homes, more than double the number than under an alternative plan, which would have given a much larger responsibility for new housing to the Inland Empire.

“This is a moment of our growing up,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said after the vote. “I understand the fear where people are like: ‘No, just keep (housing) out and maybe my traffic won’t get worse.’ Well, we’ve tried that for three decades and it’s failed. This is a new beginning.”

Thursday’s vote by the Southern California Assn. of Governments was required under a 50-year-old state law, which tells cities and counties to plan every eight years for enough growth in their communities to meet projected population increases and to account for other factors that could indicate a need for more development.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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