Corpse Flower Blooms at Cal State University, Long Beach

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A corpse flower named “Phil” housed at Cal State University, Long Beach, opened its petals for a rare and short-lived bloom on Sunday, unleashing the acrid odor for which it’s famous.

The bloom has been anticipated for weeks, with CSULB biologists posting regular updated on Phil’s progress via social media.

Cal State University, Long Beach's corpse flower, named "Phil," bloomed and released it's trademark rotting-flesh odor on June 2, 2019. (Credit: KTLA)
Cal State University, Long Beach’s corpse flower, named “Phil,” bloomed and released it’s trademark rotting-flesh odor on June 2, 2019. (Credit: KTLA)

Viewing was being held throughout the day before the 11-year-old, 5-foot 8-inch tall flower closes up. Corpse flower, or amorphophallus titanum, blooms generally occur once every several years and last only about two days.

Availability on Monday was expected to be determined after morning observations.

More information is available on CSULB’s web site.

John Fenoglio reports for the KTLA 5 News on June 2, 2019.

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