Despite rains, fire season still a threat to Southern California

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A pedestrian carries an umbrella as he walks on a flooded street on Oct. 24, 2021 in San Rafael. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A pedestrian carries an umbrella as he walks on a flooded street on Oct. 24, 2021 in San Rafael. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Record rainfall this week could mean the end of fire season for much of Northern California, experts said, but conditions in the Southland remain more tenuous, and the coming weeks could still bring fire danger.

Southern California saw much less rain than the Bay Area and Sierras, and this region’s prime fire months often come later, with huge blazes of the past burning into November and December.

Many of the factors that drive fire spread, such as drought-dried vegetation, strong winds and high temperatures, remain a possibility in Southern California — including the potential for a strong Santa Ana wind event like the one that fueled the massive, late-in-the-season Thomas fire of December 2017.

Officials say rising temperatures and Santa Ana winds in the next month could erase any moisture gains from the storms.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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