L.A. County issues extreme heat warning amid forecasts of potential 110-degree temps

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Beachgoers try to beat the heat at Santa Monica Beach on Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Santa Monica, Calif. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Beachgoers try to beat the heat at Santa Monica Beach on Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Santa Monica, Calif. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

With another round of scorching weather expected to hit the Southland beginning this weekend, Los Angeles County public health officials have issued an extreme heat warning for parts of the region.

Temperatures of up to 110 degrees are forecast in the Antelope Valley, interior valleys and mountain areas excluding the Santa Monica range as a summer heat wave peaks Sunday and Monday, according to the National Weather Service. Santa Clarita Valley, meanwhile, could reach as high as 103 degrees.

In anticipation of the dangerously hot conditions, the L.A. County Department of Public Health issued extreme heat warnings in the Antelope and Santa Clarita valleys from Saturday through Tuesday, and for the western San Fernando Valley from Sunday through Tuesday.

A heat alert will also go into effect in the eastern parts of the San Fernando and San Gabriel valleys from Sunday through Tuesday, and in the Los Angeles Basin on Monday and Tuesday.

And with warm conditions anticipated overnight, there will be little respite from the hot weather during the heat wave.

“High temperatures are not just an inconvenience, they can be dangerous and even deadly,” warned Dr. Muntu Davis, L.A. County’s public health officer.  “But we can protect ourselves, our families, and our neighbors if we take steps to remain cool and hydrated.”

L.A. County officials remind residents that they should drink plenty of water, wear sunscreen and lightweight clothing, stay indoors when temperatures are hottest, and never leave children or pets alone in a car.

People should also be aware of the symptoms of heat stroke — which include high body temperature, vomiting and clammy skin — and to call 911 if they exhibit them.

Health officials also stressed the importance of checking on those at higher risk of developing heat-related illness, such as older adults, pregnant women, children and those who are sick.

“While it is very important that everyone take special care of themselves, it is equally important that we reach out and check on others, in particular those who are especially vulnerable to the harmful effects of high temperatures, including children, the elderly, and their pets,” Davis said.

On top of potential health dangers, forecasters also warned that the combination of heat and low humidity in drought-stricken Southern California brings an increased wildfire risk.

A blaze that ignites under such conditions could spread rapidly and demonstrate extreme fire behavior, according to the weather service.

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