Grocery stores and online retailers hiring while other industries cut workers amid coronavirus pandemic

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Shoppers buy toilet paper, food and water at a Los Angeles Costco, as people begin to panic buy and stockpile essentials from fear that supplies will be affected by the spread of the coronavirus. (MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images)

Shoppers buy toilet paper, food and water at a Los Angeles Costco, as people begin to panic buy and stockpile essentials from fear that supplies will be affected by the spread of the coronavirus. (MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images)

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With an unprecedented number of customers lining up outside markets before opening hours, grocery stores nationwide are hiring to keep up with the demand amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Although the stock market continues to crash and the likelihood of a recession increases, consumers are stockpiling goods to quarantine in their homes.

Ralphs supermarket chain is immediately hiring 10,000 new workers across the country to help keep its stores open.

“As America’s grocer, we’re here for our customers and communities when they need us most, with open stores and openhearted hospitality,” an email from the company said.

Ralphs’ parent company, Kroger, one of the nation’s largest supermarkets, has apparently already hired 2,000 people and is looking to hire another 10,000.

Albertsons, owner of Safeway and Vons, is also hiring at its stores.

Amazon said Monday that it plans to hire 100,000 people to keep up with an influx of orders as the coronavirus pandemic keeps people home. The positions will be a mix of full-time and part-time positions, including delivery drivers and warehouse workers.

The company said it will raise hourly wages by $2 an hour until the end of April, as it struggles to meet consumer demands.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has continuously assured the community that there is no food shortage, clean water will continue to flow and there is no need to stockpile goods.

Many stores, including Costco Wholesale and Walmart, have instated purchasing limits on products such as toilet paper and water bottles.

Retailers are also limiting store hours and offering additional paid sick time to employees.

Target announced that as of Wednesday, they will close their stores earlier, by 9 p.m. daily, to provide additional time for cleaning and restocking each day.

Trader Joe’s is also reducing store hours and is offering workers paid sick time.

“To better support each Crew Member in making community-minded decisions, we have made available additional paid sick time to all of our Crew Members,” according to the Trader Joe’s website.

Although markets and online retailers may be hiring, a new poll found that around 18% of adults said they had been laid off or that their work hours had been cut in the past week, the Los Angeles Times reported.

“You’re looking at one of the biggest negative job numbers you’ve ever seen,” Kevin Hassett, the former chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisors under President Donald Trump told CNN Monday.

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