In the age of COVID-19, Lunar New Year takes on new forms

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Kat Nguyen-De Angelis is seen with her son Dominic, 4, at the pagoda photo display under a sea of red lanterns at the Union Market in Tustin in an undated photo.(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Kat Nguyen-De Angelis is seen with her son Dominic, 4, at the pagoda photo display under a sea of red lanterns at the Union Market in Tustin in an undated photo. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

As he entered Hong Kong Supermarket, Sam Lin scanned text messages from his wife instructing him how many red envelopes to buy.

Three dozen, she wrote — and make them large, to fit checks rather than folded wads of cash.

Lin’s nephews, nieces and in-lawswill not have the thrill of pulling crisp bills out of their red Lunar New Year good luck envelopes when the Year of the Ox begins Friday.

Normally, Lin goes to his credit union weeks ahead of the holiday to pre-order new bills — a total of $900 to $1,000 for the kids and elders in his extended family. But with the possibility that the coronavirus could be lurking on $20 or $100 bills, Lin is one of many Asian Americans forgoing traditional cash to ring in the festivities.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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