LAPD Announces Changes to Controversial Program That Uses Data to Predict Where Crimes Will Occur

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LAPD Officers Denise Vasquez and Oscar Bocanegra patrol in an area in Tarzana where a computer program predicted a higher possibility of property crimes in this undated photo. (Credit: Mel Melcon/ Los Angeles Times)

LAPD Officers Denise Vasquez and Oscar Bocanegra patrol in an area in Tarzana where a computer program predicted a higher possibility of property crimes in this undated photo. (Credit: Mel Melcon/ Los Angeles Times)

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Los Angeles Police Department leaders announced changes Tuesday to a controversial program that predicts where property crimes could occur throughout the city.

The changes come seven months after an inspector general couldn’t determine whether the department’s predictive-policing program, called PredPol, helped reduce crime. Critics contend the program leads to heavier policing of minority neighborhoods.

Chief Michel Moore told a meeting of the L.A. Police Commission that the LAPD needs location-based strategies to target crime and keep residents safe. Moore said the department will adjust programs when needed and that he disagrees with critics who believe the program unfairly targets Latino and black neighborhoods.

“The manner of how we use data is informed by the evolution of technology,” Moore said. “We’re going to smartly use our precious resources.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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