Larry Aubry, L.A. black activist icon, dies at 86

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Larry Aubry stands outside the Southern California Library in the Vermont-Slauson neighborhood in this undated photo. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Larry Aubry stands outside the Southern California Library in the Vermont-Slauson neighborhood in this undated photo. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

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Larry Aubry, an icon of black activist Los Angeles who witnessed white resistance to school integration and the Watts and 1992 riots without losing faith that hard work and outrage would manifest racial justice, has died.

Aubry, 86, died May 16 after a short illness, writer Erin Aubry Kaplan, one of his five children, said. A writer as well as an activist, he composed more than 1,700 hard-hitting columns over 33 years for the Los Angeles Sentinel and served two terms on the Inglewood School Board.

But it was his decades of social, political and community activism on issues including black education, job training, police accountability, fair housing and reparations that shaped his life. The groups he helped found or lead spanned the early civil rights era of the 1960s to Black Lives Matter, and included Advocates for Black Strategic Alternatives, which most recently fought to expand rent control, and the Black Community Clergy and Labor Alliance, which has worked on housing and charter school issues.

“When I was young and asked my mom what he did, she said he went to meetings,” said Aubry Kaplan, who is a contributing writer to the L.A. Times’ Opinion section. “It took a while to understand what he did and why it was bigger than us as a family.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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