Long lines during L.A. County primary voting were largely due to technology flaws, report finds

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People cast their ballot during the presidential primary vote in Glendale on Super Tuesday, March 3, 2020. (ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)

People cast their ballot during the presidential primary vote in Glendale on March 3, 2020. (ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)

The delays and long lines that marred voting in Los Angeles County’s March 3 primary election were due largely to a key component of the county’s new $300-million electronic voting system, which was designed to check in voters at polling places but was hampered by slow digital communication links, according to a recent report by the county.

The highly-anticipated voting system, the first major changes in the county’s voting process in more than a decade, relied on electronic poll books to register voters at centers across the region. But the poll books, the digital equivalent of paper voter rolls used at traditional polling places, suffered from major delays due to network and capacity issues, according to the report by the The Los Angeles County Registrar’s Office.

The delays left thousands of voters frustrated, and the problems were compounded by election workers who lacked the authority and training to address the issues.

“Even though ample network bandwidth was available, the PollPads had issues synchronizing data with the voter database and the voter search function was too limited for the size of the County’s electorate,” according to the report, which was posted on the registrar’s website in late April and was not formally announced.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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