Los Angeles Is Giving Out Free Trees for Yards and Neighborhoods; Here’s How to Get up to 7

Local News
You can see examples of some of L.A.'s oldest trees at the arboretum in Elysian Park. As the city embarks on a plan to plant 90,000 new trees in the city, residents can pick species for their yard and for their street.(Credit: Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)

You can see examples of some of L.A.’s oldest trees at the arboretum in Elysian Park. As the city embarks on a plan to plant 90,000 new trees in the city, residents can pick species for their yard and for their street.(Credit: Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)

Want a free tree for your yard or neighborhood? L.A.’s Green New Deal to plant 90,000 trees in the city over the next two years is a bonus for residents. The city will give out up to seven free yard and/or street trees to qualifying residents. More than two dozen species are listed on the city’s website, with information about their projected height and defining characteristics. Most are drought-tolerant.

Small trees include crape myrtles with pink, red or white flowers, which can grow to a height of 25 feet. Medium trees range from projected 25- to 35-foot-high silk floss trees with pink flowers and evergreen olive trees to jacarandas, with their mesmerizing blue or lavender flowers, which can grow 50 feet high. Large trees, some of which can grow up to 80 feet tall, include coast live oaks, which are native to parts of L.A.; Canary Island, Italian stone and African fern pines; and deodar cedars, native to the Himalayas.

“A family can sit at their computer in their PJs, pick out a tree online and have it delivered to their yard,” said L.A.’s first forest officer, Rachel Malarich. “All the work is done for them up to the actual planting. But don’t worry. The trees come with stakes, ties and fertilizer pellets, along with easy-to-follow instructions on how to plant them.”

Neighbors can get together and request free trees for their street on the City Plants website. “One of our nonprofit partners will come and assess the location,” Malarich said. “If it meets our criteria — enough space between the sidewalk and the road; no low overhead power lines — they will obtain the necessary city permits and plant the trees for them. The neighbors must sign an agreement to water them for at least the first five years.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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