Malibu Jewish Camps Destroyed in Woolsey Fire

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Camp Kramer's wooden Menorah and plaque honoring founder Rabbi Alfred Wolf were still standing after the camp burned in the Woolsey Fire. (Credit: Ben Poston / Los Angeles Times)

Camp Kramer’s wooden Menorah and plaque honoring founder Rabbi Alfred Wolf were still standing after the camp burned in the Woolsey Fire. (Credit: Ben Poston / Los Angeles Times)

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One of the first things Rabbi Alfred Wolf did after joining the Wilshire Boulevard Temple in 1949 was start a camping program for children. Wolf envisioned a place that would be the antithesis of the Nazi Germany he had escaped.

And it would be not only for Jewish children, but for other children from Los Angeles’ burgeoning and increasingly diverse communities. There they could organize and try to improve their lot and those of others, said his son Dan Wolf, 68.

The rabbi built two camps in Malibu: the beachside Hess Kramer and its sister camp Hilltop. In the 1960s, they became another home for a group of young Latinos who helped launch the Chicano movement.

This week, the camps’ director, Seth Toybes, confirmed that Camp Hilltop was destroyed by the Woolsey fire.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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