Midcentury Modern Homeless Shelter Rises in Abandoned Hollywood Library

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A women’s shelter opened Tuesday in a restored Midcentury Modern library building in Hollywood, continuing the trend of converting distinctive structures to take homeless people off the sagging entertainment community’s streets.

The 30-bed facility on Gardner Street below Sunset Boulevard brings to seven the number of new L.A. homeless shelters, and 377 beds, since Mayor Eric Garcetti’s A Bridge Home program launched last year.

The mayor had called for at least 15 shelters throughout the city, and 1,500 beds, by this year. Hollywood, with a homeless population of 2,500, second only to downtown, is emerging as a shelter hub.

A 64-bed crisis housing facility for women opened in November in the former Hollywood Studio Club, a 1926 Mediterranean landmark designed by Hearst Castle architect Julia Morgan.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

  • The courtyard of the Gardner Street Women’s Bridge Housing Center is seen in Hollywood in September 2019. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
  • Neighbor Karen Miniotti looks over the Gardner Public Library’s original circulation desk, which was restored in the newly repurposed Gardner Library Women’s Bridge Shelter in Hollywood, on Sept. 10, 2019. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times)
  • The interior of the Gardner Library Women’s Bridge Shelter is seen in Hollywood in September 2019. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
  • Los Angeles City Councilman David Ryu explores an under-bed storage area inside the Gardner Library Women’s Bridge Shelter in Hollywood in September 2019. (Credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times)
  • A noise-shielding metal screen on the facade of the 1959 Midcentury Modern Gardner Street library, which has been repurposed as the Gardner Library Women’s Bridge Shelter in Hollywood, is seen on Sept. 10, 2019. (Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times)

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