Mountain lion caught in Orange County neighborhood released back into the wild

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In this photo provided by the San Diego Humane Society, San Diego Humane Society director of wildlife medicine, Jon Enyart, DVM, right, and Amelia Viera, with California Department of Fish and Wildlife, attach a tracking collar to a mountain lion at the Humane Society's Ramona Wildlife Center prior to it's release on Thursday, July 29, 2021, in the Santa Ana mountains. The 1-year-old male cub was captured July 13 after being spotted several times in a neighborhood in Mission Viejo. California Department of Fish and Wildlife wardens took the mountain lion to the San Diego Humane Society's Ramona Wildlife Center, where it was evaluated and treated for parasites before being returned to its home territory. (San Diego Humane Society via AP)

In this photo provided by the San Diego Humane Society, San Diego Humane Society director of wildlife medicine, Jon Enyart, DVM, right, and Amelia Viera, with California Department of Fish and Wildlife, attach a tracking collar to a mountain lion at the Humane Society’s Ramona Wildlife Center prior to it’s release on Thursday, July 29, 2021, in the Santa Ana mountains. The 1-year-old male cub was captured July 13 after being spotted several times in a neighborhood in Mission Viejo. California Department of Fish and Wildlife wardens took the mountain lion to the San Diego Humane Society’s Ramona Wildlife Center, where it was evaluated and treated for parasites before being returned to its home territory. (San Diego Humane Society via AP)

A young mountain lion captured after roaming an Orange County neighborhood was released to the wild in the Santa Ana Mountains this week.

The 1-year-old male cub was captured July 13 after being spotted several times in a neighborhood in Mission Viejo.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife wardens took the mountain lion to the San Diego Humane Society’s Ramona Wildlife Center, where he was evaluated and treated for parasites.

Once rescuers determined the cub could survive on his own, game wardens returned him to his home territory.

“Mountain lions are in many communities in Southern California, but it is important to remember they need to remain wild at heart and not get comfortable around people — for everyone’s safety,” said Christine Barton, director of operations & wildlife rehabilitation at the wildlife center.

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