Newsom Criticized for Veto of ‘Complete Streets’ Bill Requiring Pedestrian, Bicycle Consideration on Caltrans Projects

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A bicyclist crosses the Fourth Street Bridge over the Los Angeles River Feb. 21, 2008, in Los Angeles, California. (Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

A bicyclist crosses the Fourth Street Bridge over the Los Angeles River Feb. 21, 2008, in Los Angeles, California. (Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

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As Gov. Gavin Newsom ratchets up California’s response to climate change, Republicans and even some in his own party are lashing out at his plans to tap into billions of dollars in gas taxes and vehicle fees earmarked for transportation projects.

The debate centers on the use of up to $5 billion generated annually by SB 1, a 2017 law that increased the gas tax and vehicle fees to address a backlog of road repairs and improve mass transit. Some 20% was dedicated for rail and mass transit, and the law specifies that $100 million annually will be used to build more bike paths, crosswalks and sidewalks.

Newsom upset some fellow Democrats when he vetoed a bill Saturday that his administration said would have expanded the existing law’s $100 million in subsidies for bicyclist and pedestrian improvements to a yearly total of $1 billion.

“This veto is extremely disappointing,” said state Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), author of the bill, which he said would fight climate change by making it safer for people to leave their cars behind. “Far too many of our state highways that run through local communities are dangerous for people who aren’t driving cars.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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