One of California’s Last Black Enclaves Threatened by Inglewood’s Upcoming Entertainment Complex

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The rising stadium complex looms behind the gated community of Renaissance Homes in Inglewood in this undated photo. One woman who lives next door to the new L.A. Rams and Chargers stadium and entertainment complex received a notice that the monthly rent on her two-bedroom Inglewood apartment would spike from $1,145 to $2,725.(Credit: Dania Maxwell/Los Angeles Times)

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Inglewood has come a long way since Dr. Dre proclaimed in the ’90s that it was “always up to no good.”

A surge of economic development is wiping away its reputation as a battle zone for rival gangs and promises to remake the city not only into a sports and entertainment mecca but also a cultural destination.

But now that Inglewood is on the come up, longtime residents and city officials face a different challenge: Many who have weathered decades of hardship no longer can afford to live there and are being left out of the economic renaissance.

Donald Martin, 67, lost the roof over his head after a new landlord evicted him with just 60 days’ notice from the building he had lived in for almost a decade.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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