Pasadena police shared license plate data with ICE, despite pledge not to share that info

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A "License Plate Reader" or LPR, one of two mounted on the trunk of a Metropolotian Police Department (MPD) is seen on a police car in Washington, DC, December 1, 2011. (PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images)

A “License Plate Reader” or LPR, one of two mounted on the trunk of a Metropolotian Police Department (MPD) is seen on a police car in Washington, DC, December 1, 2011. (PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images)

When the city of Pasadena approved the police department’s request to purchase three new automatic license plate readers, Commander Jason Clawson promised the city’s public safety committee the department wouldn’t share any data with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

“Robust policies and procedures are in place to prevent the system and the information it gathers from being used inappropriately or differently from its intended purpose,” Clawson told the City Council’s public safety committee at the time.

The department reiterated its pledge to limit data-sharing at a Sept. 21 meeting, when Pasadena City Council voted to authorize the purchase of new license plate readers from Vigilant Solutions in Livermore, Calif., so long as the contract included provisions prohibiting the sharing of data for monetary reasons and limiting data sharing to police agencies only.

But documents show Pasadena police have been passing license plate data directly to ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations arm.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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