Police Commissioners, Critics Question LAPD’s Reports on Suspected Terrorist Activity

Local News
George Herod joins the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition protest outside Los Angeles police headquarters to demand an end to the suspicious activity reporting program on June 11, 2019. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

George Herod joins the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition protest outside Los Angeles police headquarters to demand an end to the suspicious activity reporting program on June 11, 2019. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Critics of a Los Angeles Police Department program that identifies potential terrorist activities called for it to be dismantled Tuesday, complaining that people of some races and ethnicities are unfairly targeted.

An audit from the Police Commission’s inspector general said the LAPD mostly followed correct policy in classifying 348 reports of suspicious activity filed by community members and police in 2016 and 2017. But two dozen critics turned out at a meeting of the panel, many holding signs denouncing the program.

While the audit contained few criticisms of the reporting program, Inspector General Mark P. Smith determined that the LAPD should update some policies, including better identification of the race of people suspected of suspicious activity by either police or the public. That issue also drew scrutiny from some commission members.

“What are the protections against abuses?” Commissioner Dale Bonner asked. “What protections, if any, are in place?”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

Most Popular

Latest News

More News

KTLA on Instagram

Instagram

KTLA on Facebook

KTLA on Twitter