Remains of Southern California Soldier Missing Since Korean War Come Home

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Historians sometimes call the Korean War the forgotten war.

Robert Witt's sister Laverne Minnick was there as her brother's casket arrived at LAX. “I put my head on the casket and talked to Robert,” she said. “I told him he was home.” (Credit: Family photo)
Robert Witt's sister Laverne Minnick was there as her brother's casket arrived at LAX. “I put my head on the casket and talked to Robert,” she said. “I told him he was home.” (Credit: Family photo)

But it is hardly forgotten by the families of the fallen — including the more than 7,800 U.S. military personnel whose bodies have never been accounted for.

Like Army Cpl. Robert Witt, who was 20 when he was reported missing during a brutal battle near Chosin Reservoir in December 1950. He had grown up in Bellflower, graduated from high school in Norwalk and joined the Army in 1948.

In 1953, U.S. officials determined that Witt had died of malnutrition while a POW, but his remains were not among those that were repatriated.

Click here to read the full story at LATimes.com.

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