Rowing Was the Ideal Sport for Stowaways in College Admissions Scandal, Prosecutors Say

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Olivia Jade Giannulli, Lori Loughlin and Isabella Rose Giannulli attend The Women's Cancer Research Fund's An Unforgettable Evening Benefit Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on Feb. 28, 2019, in Beverly Hills. (Credit: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Olivia Jade Giannulli, Lori Loughlin and Isabella Rose Giannulli attend The Women’s Cancer Research Fund’s An Unforgettable Evening Benefit Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on Feb. 28, 2019, in Beverly Hills. (Credit: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

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Designer J. Mossimo Giannulli and actress Lori Loughlin wanted their daughters to attend USC — so much so, prosecutors say, that they turned to a college admissions consultant known as a miracle worker in rarefied circles of Hollywood, Silicon Valley and the Newport Coast.

William “Rick” Singer had a trusted scam, one he described in federal court last month: He bribed college coaches and administrators to recruit his clients’ children as student athletes. He drew on a number of sports. His clients’ children played water polo, tennis, volleyball, football, basketball, soccer; they sailed, ran track, competed in the pole vault — at least on paper.

But one pastime was particularly suited to Singer’s scheme. According to court documents, when it came to helping Giannulli and Loughlin, he turned to a sport with large rosters, little fan or media scrutiny, and wide latitude in recruiting female athletes — as well as one position that requires little physicality.

He told USC that Giannulli and Loughlin’s daughters rowed crew. They had never rowed competitively, prosecutors say.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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