California Beachgoers Cautioned That Stingrays Are ‘Out in Full Force’

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An employee in SCUBA gear feeds stingrays and other fish at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, CA, 20 May 2004. (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

An employee in SCUBA gear feeds stingrays and other fish at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, CA, 20 May 2004. (Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

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San Diego lifeguards are reminding beachgoers entering the ocean to shuffle their feet to avoid painful encounters with stingrays.

The lifeguards posted on their Facebook page last weekend that the stingrays “are out in full force.”

Round rays common in California coastal shallows are typically partially buried in sand while hunting prey.

When stepped on, the rays respond with a venom-covered barb in their tail.

Lifeguards treat injured swimmers by soaking their feet in hot water to deactivate the venom.

The Aquarium of the Pacific says the round ray is the most likely of rays to be involved in injuries to waders and swimmers.

Keeping feet flat on the sand and shuffling along will usually cause a ray to quickly swim away rather than striking with its tail.

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