Several L.A. librarians join the ranks of contact tracers to aid in COVID-19 pandemic

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Lupie Leyva, a manager and librarian at the Robert Louis Stevenson Library in Boyle Heights, does coronavirus contact tracing from her home in Whittier. (Emily Leyva)

Lupie Leyva, a manager and librarian at the Robert Louis Stevenson Library in Boyle Heights, does coronavirus contact tracing from her home in Whittier. (Emily Leyva)

Lupie Leyva is good at tracking things down. A kind of detective, if you will.

She’s organized and meticulous, curious and tech-savvy. For the last nine years, it has served her well as senior librarian and manager at the Robert Louis Stevenson Branch Library in Boyle Heights, where no book — however obscure — can escape her once she’s on the case.

Now, Leyva is using those skills to help fight the spread of the coronavirus. The 46-year-old is doing contact tracing of people who have tested positive in an effort to reduce their chance of infecting others.

“The reason I volunteered for contact tracing is that it’s really the same thing” as being a librarian, Leyva said. “It’s still helping people, it’s helping my community, it’s trying to get my community back to normal so that people will feel comfortable going back into the library.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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