Sierra Nevada Snowpack Could Shrink up to 79% by End of Century, Study Finds

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The snow is currently 9 feet deep on Mt. Shasta, but a new study suggests that the Sierra snowpack could be reduced by 79% by the end of the century. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

The snow is currently 9 feet deep on Mt. Shasta, but a new study suggests that the Sierra snowpack could be reduced by 79% by the end of the century. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

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The snow season, which started this month, is off to a good start.

A series of December storms covered the Sierra Nevada with heavy snow, leaving the snowpack at 106% of average, according to the state’s snow survey.

But a new study suggests that Californians won’t always be able to rely on melting snow to trickle down the mountains each spring, filling state reservoirs for use over the long, dry summers.

According to a new report, the size of the Sierra snowpack could shrink by as much as 79% by the century’s end if humans don’t limit greenhouse emissions.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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