Some Black L.A. parents see less bullying, racism with online learning and are keeping kids home, advocacy group says

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Cali Corbin, 5, a kindergartner at Westwood Charter School, works on a mathematical exercise under the watchful eye of her mother Renee Bailey in their home in Los Angeles on April 9. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Cali Corbin, 5, a kindergartner at Westwood Charter School, works on a mathematical exercise under the watchful eye of her mother Renee Bailey in their home in Los Angeles on April 9. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Some parents of Black Los Angeles school students opted to keep their children in distance learning after schools reopened in April because they wanted to shield them from inequitable and sometimes harsh treatment on campus, according to a report from a local advocacy group.

Among Black parents surveyed, 82% cited COVID-19 as one factor for keeping their children home and 43% said they were concerned about bullying, racism and low academic standards, according to the report by Speak Up, which conducted focus groups, analyzed district data and conducted its own survey.

The survey of 500 L.A. Unified parents — 96 of whom were black — asked parents about their children’s academic experiences during the pandemic. The opinions expressed by Black parents added new insights into the low return-to-school rates this spring in the nation’s second-largest school district.

Speak Up’s survey respondents roughly match district demographics.Additional Black parents were then surveyed to take a closer look at themes that emerged from focus groups that Speak Up conducted with Black students in 2020. The survey was conducted March 18 to 23.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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