Southern California’s Precipitation Remains Above Normal Thanks to December Storms

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Low-hanging clouds blanket downtown L.A. as seen above Ela Park in Lincoln Heights on Dec. 4, 2019. (Credit: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Low-hanging clouds blanket downtown L.A. as seen above Ela Park in Lincoln Heights on Dec. 4, 2019. (Credit: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Thanks to December storms, much of Southern California will ring in the new year with above-normal precipitation.

Meanwhile, the northern part of the state remains mostly below normal after the first six months of the rainfall season, according to Jan Null of Golden Gate Weather Services.

Northern California’s rainy season got off to a late start, but Southern California’s was a little early this year.

San Francisco and Crescent City are at 73% of normal to date as of Monday. Sacramento has seen 79% of its normal rainfall, and an eight-station index of measuring locations in the Sierra Nevada north of Lake Tahoe stands at 73% of normal. This is an area that includes the Sacramento, American and Feather rivers, as well as the state’s biggest dams. It is crucial for water customers throughout the state, and in particular for Southern California.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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