State bars access to LAPD’s entries to CalGang database amid allegations that officers falsified information

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Los Angeles Police Department headquarters is seen in a photo from Feb. 7, 2013. (Credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Los Angeles Police Department headquarters is seen in a photo from Feb. 7, 2013. (Credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

The California Attorney General’s Office has removed access to data entered by the LAPD into the CalGang system as allegations of falsified information put the tool into question.

Attorney General Xavier Beccera’s office, which has oversight of the statewide database of suspected gang members, announced the move Tuesday. It comes less than a month after the Los Angeles Police Department suspended its use of the system.

Earlier this year, accusations came to light that officers patrolling South Los Angeles logged false information into the database to boost statistics. The LAPD disclosed in January that it launched a probe after a Van Nuys mother reported that her son had been misidentified as a gang member, according to the L.A. Times.

In February, the state justice department announced its own investigation of LAPD’s use of the CalGang system.

Moore said last month that an audit confirmed misconduct by officers, including entering incorrect information, according to Becerra’s office.

Three officers are now facing criminal charges as the justice department continues to review LAPD’s records and policies, Becerra’s office said.

LAPD entered nearly 25% of about 78,000 records in the CalGang database, according to the state attorney general.

The justice department said it has notified law enforcement agencies across California that it has barred access to LAPD’s entries, urging them to examine their own CalGang records.

“If a quarter of the program’s data is suspect, then the utility of the entire system rightly comes under the microscope,” Becerra said in a statement.

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