State Bill Holding Police More Accountable for Killing Civilians Is Scaled Back, But Seeks to Toughen Internal Policies of Police

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Black Lives Matter protesters march for Stephon Clark on the day of his funeral in downtown Sacramento on March 29, 2018. (Credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Black Lives Matter protesters march for Stephon Clark on the day of his funeral in downtown Sacramento on March 29, 2018. (Credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

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California lawmakers and civil rights advocates have significantly scaled back legislation aimed at holding police more accountable for killing civilians.

Under changes announced Friday, Assembly Bill 931 would no longer make it easier under state law for prosecutors to criminally charge officers if they use deadly force. Instead, the measure now seeks to toughen internal police policies across California, which would allow for departments to discipline officers and face civil lawsuits if new use-of-force standards are violated.

Assemblywoman Shirley Weber (D-San Diego), the bill’s author, said the revised measure would still mark a key departure from the state’s existing rules for when police are allowed to kill civilians while on duty.

“This will be a profound change in the culture of policing in California, a change based on the sanctity of life and the obligation to preserve it except under the most dangerous conditions,” Weber said in a statement.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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