Tuesday Is Voters' Last Day to Register for California Primary Without Having to Use a Provisional Ballot

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Rosa Ayala checks her ballot after voting in the June 7, 2016, presidential primary at Sabores de Oaxaca, a Mexican restaurant in Mid-City Los Angeles. (Credit: Michael Owen Baker / AFP / Getty Images)

Rosa Ayala checks her ballot after voting in the June 7, 2016, presidential primary at Sabores de Oaxaca, a Mexican restaurant in Mid-City Los Angeles. (Credit: Michael Owen Baker / AFP / Getty Images)

Tuesday is the last day you can register to vote in California’s primary election without needing to submit a provisional ballot.

You can check your registration status for the March 3 primary on the California Secretary of State’s website.

Even if you miss Tuesday’s deadline, you can file for same-day registration any time on or before Election Day by visiting your county elections office, vote center or local polling place. You’ll fill out a registration form then be given a ballot, and your vote will be counted after election officials verify your registration.

Californians can now also change their party affiliation at the voting booth under a law signed last week by Gov. Gavin Newsom. Those who want to vote in the Republican presidential primary must be registered with the party, but voters with no party preference can vote in the Democratic, Libertarian and American Independent contests by requesting a ballot.

The last day to request a vote-by-mail ballot is next Tuesday, Feb. 25. You can do so by contacting your county elections office or visting any polling place or vote center. Mail-in ballots must be postmarked or dropped off at a ballot box by March 3.

Early voting in California’s primary has been underway since Feb. 4, and Secretary of State Alex Padilla said he expects a record turnout. More than 20.4 million Californians — 80.95% of those eligible — were registered to vote as of Jan. 3, according to Padilla’s office.

But with expanded same-day registration — something previously allowed only at county elections offices — a high volume of provisional ballots could mean it takes days or weeks to declare a Democratic winner in the state, officials have warned.

In addition to presidential candidates, voters are weighing in on congressional races, state legislative seats and a statewide school bond.

Find a list of polling and ballot drop-off locations, voter information guides and other details on the upcoming election on the state’s official website.

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